Contact:

Name:                Fr. Andrew Heaslip

Email:                 compendiumclips@gmail.com

Address:            Fr. Andrew Heaslip
                                            St. Mary's Catholic Church
                                            1420 K St.
                                            Lincoln, NE 68508

                  Social Media:    Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CompendiumClips
                                            YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/user/CompendiumClips
                                            Twitter - https://twitter.com/CompendiumClips


About:

    Compendium Clips is a video series which thematically covers the teachings of the Catholic Church by using the Compendium Catechism of the Catholic Church as its basis. The goal of Compendium Clips is to share the Catholic faith by going through the entire Compendium Catechism in 5 to 7 min videos each of which not only build upon one another but also can be viewed individually by topic. This teaching series is produced by Fr. Andrew Heaslip who is a priest of the Diocese of Lincoln currently serving as the associate pastor at St. Patrick Church in McCook, Nebraska.



History:

In December of 2012 a couple of high school students in McCook, Nebraska came to me asking to start a bible study.  I wasn’t sure if it would work at first; but they were very dedicated and gathered together a good-sized group; and so we went through the Gospel of John.  After that things started to grow a little and they wanted another bible study.  Now because of their faithfulness and enthusiasm I thought we could extend it to two bible studies, the second one being led by the students’ themselves. They agreed and started going around to see who was interested.  But then a problem arose—all their communications and planning were posted on a Facebook group and I wasn’t on Facebook.  So I could either pass along every piece of information that needed to be communicated so that they could post it on the group or I could take the jump and join myself.  I decided to go with the latter. In about two days I began to be amazed because I realized how powerful a tool Facebook is for communication. 

Next, after I finding several friends, acquaintances, and a few others I noticed some posts that shared ideas that simply weren't true.  I was still new to the social media world and didn’t know the best way to respond?  Then the idea came to mind that I should try to make and post little video clips that go into the basics of philosophy.  I started to go through my seminary philosophy notes to see if it was feasible.  After some prayer, reflection, and study I decided that philosophy wasn’t the way to go.  Instead I should teach the Catholic faith itself.  First, I thought about using the United States Catholic Catechism for Adults as the basis but this book, while not as big as the Catechism of the Catholic Church, still had too much material for a series of short video clips.  Fortunately, in 2005 Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI following the work of St. John Paul the Great promulgated the Compendium Catechism of the Catholic Church which is a 175 page “Q & A” catechism summarizing the 688 page Catechism of the Catholic Church.  Because I had already used the Compendium Catechism as the basis for other classes I decided to use it for this project also. Finally, since I wanted to present this material in short video clips, I thought of the name “Compendium Clips” for the title.

            Then the next problem came—how does one make a video?  In the summer of 2012 I purchased a Macbook Pro and discovered a little program called iMove.  On it one can film, edit, insert images, add sound bits, and include transitions—everything for which I was looking.  Realizing that Compendium Clips was feasible I began to plunge into the world of web design, domains, Google Sites, YouTube, Facebook Pages, and Twitter.  Now, while I didn’t immediately drown I came pretty close; and so, swimming to the comfort of the shore gave up the idea for a while, thinking, ‘do I really have time for this and will anyone even watch them?’  Then the difficult, yet, very fruitful, practice started to take effect—trust in Jesus—meaning I didn’t and still don’t know if I am going to be able to see the whole project through or how fruitful it will be.  Yet, up to now I’ve had the time and inspiration, and at this point it looks promising to reach at least some.  If you have spent the time to read this history please also say a prayer for the effectiveness of this ministry.  Thank you and God bless!